Awards

Barren - Winner of the El Rey Award for Outstanding SciFi: 2014 Barcelona International Film Festival.
Starring Amanda Barron as Laura

Click poster to watch the trailer.

Press

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Official poster for the feature Homo Faber: Trois Femmes.
Starring Daphné Baiwir, Amanda Barron & Marthe Kelle
Huffington Post article The Gift of Red Hair
Amanda was video interviewed by Ama Yawson about being a Redhead.  
New York Times Article 'Exploring the Bozo Mystique'
Amanda Barron was featured with the Clowns Ex Machina in an article written by April Dembosky.

Reviews

Much Ado About Nothing - NY Shakespeare Exchange - Off-Broadway at Urban Stages 

OnStage Review by Thomas Burnes Sculley
“Amanda Barron lends rich, pristine life to the easily overlooked role of Antonia.”  
OnStage Much Ado Review

Huffington Post Review by Jed Ryan 
“Much Ado About Nothing boasts a look that’s as dynamic as its cast.” 

Huffpost

 

The Real Thing - Northern Stage 

Rutland Herald Review by Jim Lowe 
"as Annie [Amanda Barron], matched him (Richard Hollis) all the way, convincing with an amazing amount of subtlety and nuance. The two managed to be touching and extremely funny simultaneously." 
Times Argus Review

 

 

Movin' Macbeth - Here SOHO 

The following scene is the evening’s best. Lady Macbeth is one of the greatest roles in literature, and in Amanda Barron Avalon Theatre of e/motion has found a really dynamic and haunting dark queen. Tall, red-haired and striking, she is as strong an actress as she is a dancer.

Her Lady Macbeth resists the temptation to make the audience like her, the result being that we do anyway—her strength and joy in her own will are that seductive. She carries off the exultant, odd gestures in reading Macbeth’s letter stylishly and naturally.

Her incantation to the spirits to shake off her natural womanly aversion to cruelty... achieves the power of a demonic spell. The chanting repetition of “unsex me here” and the solo dance that follows are exciting and illuminating. This energetic, violent dance flows as naturally as any heroine from Rodgers and Hammerstein breaking into song because the emotion is too full for words.

…But [Amanda] Barron’s mad scene, when it does come, is enlightening—she chooses to portray not guilt but repression, a guilt so buried that when awake this Lady Macbeth would honestly deny its existence. This is a fascinating choice. Juxtaposed to the final battle, her madness is also haunting



Review by Gwen Orel - TheatreScene.netquite ballet. And it's not quite theatre. And it's not quite Shakespeare. But who cares, because this is one of the most colorful, weirdest takes on "the Scottish play" you'll see this season.


Shakespeare's shortest play and an apple are all it takes to get things rolling in e/Motion's theatre and dance adaptation of Shakespeare's gory classic. Bloody good.

Click for full review.


Hellmouth - NY International Fring Festival 

Review by Joshua Tanzer – Offoffoff.com 
"The second play, "Hellmouth" packs the most punch. …and prim, nervous, conservatively dressed Alison (Amanda Barron), [is] not touching her bottle."

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A Silent Exchange
Review by Jade Esteban Estrada – OOBR.com
Greenwich Street Theatre
 by Peter Hilton

Barron did a great job of playing the straight man to the audience in the appropriate style of the day.A Silent Exchange is a potent scene played out without an utterance from the actors. It’s 1910 in Prospect Park, Brooklyn. A female film director (Shenoy) tries to shoot a silent movie of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night despite the unprofessional behavior of her main actors. Brewer played the celebrated actress and Silence played the action hero who would not be caught dead performing with her and refuses to perform. Brewer kept the laughs coming by transforming every sword fight scene into a Charleston.

for full review.Click

one of several funny touches in this scene, but merely a preparation for the increasingly weighty revelations that are to come. And when they do come, they are very smoothly handled — not in stormy outbursts but in plain talk suited to a brother and sister who've already had this painful discussion before but need to give their old wound a little poke periodically. This is no dramatic showdown, just a very well-captured moment linking the past and future in two people's lives.